Information Specifically for Parents


Testing Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

Students who receive special testing accommodations in high school may qualify for similar accommodations on the SAT. If eligibility is determined by the College Board, students can receive special accommodations for all College Board tests, including the PSAT, SAT, and AP Exams.

Eligible Disabilities


The College Board defines a disability as "a condition that substantially limits [a student's] learning." Eligible disabilities include, but are not limited to:

  • Hearing impairments
  • Vision impairments
  • ADD or ADHD
  • Learning disabilities
  • Certain medical or physical conditions
  • Certain psychiatric disorders
  • To determine if other disabilities are eligible for accommodated testing, speak with your counselor or special education coordinator or complete and submit the Student Eligibility Form, as discussed below.

Possible Accommodations


Accommodations are granted in four specific areas: presentation, responding, timing/scheduling, and setting. Examples of accommodations in each setting include, but are not limited to:

Presentation

  • Large print
  • A reader
  • Magnification
  • Braille
  • Use of a highlighter

Responding

  • Tape recorder
  • Verbal dictation to scribe
  • Recording answers in the test book

Timing/Scheduling

  • Extended test time
  • Multiple day testing
  • More frequent breaks

Setting

  • Private room
  • Special lighting
  • Use of screens

Requesting Accommodations


All students seeking accommodations for a College Board test must complete a Student Eligibility Form, which can only be obtained from a school counselor or special education coordinator. If your school officials do not have these forms, contact Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) at (609) 771-7137. Plan to complete your Student Eligibility Form at least seven weeks prior to the test date in order to receive accommodations for the test.

Many students requesting accommodated testing will have formal written education plans, such as an IEPs or a 504 Plans, filed with the special education department at their high school. These plans ensure special accommodations for the students in their current high school courses, and often align with College Board's guidelines for documentation of a disability. These students should follow the steps below to complete their application for accommodations:

1. Complete Section I of the Student Eligibility Form with requested accommodations and submit to your school's special education coordinator.

2. Special education officials complete Sections II and III, and send the completed Student Eligibility Form to the College Board.

3. The College Board will take up to five weeks to review your request. Should they request a copy of your IEP or 504 Plan from your high school, the process will take an additional two weeks.

4. You and your school will receive a copy of an eligibility letter. If approved, the letter will contain an SSD identification number, which you must use when registering for a College Board test. If refused, the letter will contain an explanation of why your request for accommodations was not granted.

5. Register for the test, either by mail or online, using the SSD identification number. If you registered for the test prior to gaining eligibility, you can call the College Board (609-771-7137) at least two weeks prior to the test to give your SSD identification number for accommodations.

Students without a formal written education plan must submit documentation of their disability directly to the College Board, without the assistance of the special education department:

1. Complete Section I of the Student Eligibility Form with requested accommodations. Do not complete Section II or III.

2. Send the Student Eligibility Form with required documentation to the College Board. Required documentation includes current test results used to diagnose the disability, as well as the credentials of the evaluator.

3. The College Board will take up to five weeks to review your request.

4. You and your school will receive a copy of an eligibility letter. If approved, the letter will contain an SSD identification number, which you must use when registering for a College Board test. If refused, the letter will contain an explanation of why your request for accommodations was not granted.

5. Register for the test, either by mail or online, using the SSD identification number. If you registered for the test prior to gaining eligibility, you can call the College Board (609-771-7137) at least two weeks prior to the test to give your SSD identification number for accommodations.

For More Information


If you feel that you are eligible for accommodated testing, PowerScore recommends reviewing complete instructions at the College Board's Services for Students with Disabilities website.
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